Take Control Of Your Asthma With The Best Products

Asthma Control

Take a Look at The Best Products For Treating Asthma + Tips And Coping Mechanisms

With more than 17 million men, women, and kids suffering from asthma in the United States alone, there is a very good chance that you or someone you know is affected with this respiratory condition. Fortunately, this selection of carefully selected products will help you get control of your asthma.


If you’re caught without your inhaler when you have an attack, grab a cup of coffee. The caffeine in the beverage will open up your airways and allow you to breathe a little easier. If you don’t have a caffeinated beverage on hand, the small amounts of caffeine in a chocolate bar can also help.

Learn how to recognize asthma so you can treat it. When you get asthma, you usually have difficulties breathing and feel as if your chest were getting tighter. Asthma is often accompanied by coughing and wheezing. If you experience different symptoms, you might have another illness that requires more medical attention.

Get a bronchodilator or an inhaler. These products usually allow you to breathe better a few seconds after you use them. There are risks inherent to using these products, but if you use them as prescribed they should make your life easier. Ask your doctor about what kind of inhaler you should use.

A good tip that can help you if you suffer from asthma is to make sure you have some kind of emergency plan in place. You never know when your asthma is going to flare up. When this happens, you should have some kind of emergency plan to act on so that you don’t waste any time.

A good tip that can help you if your child has asthma is to do everything you can to educate your child about asthma. Young children have no idea what asthma is or how it affects them, so it’s your job to inform them and to help them work through it.

It is important that you keep your home and work environment clean if you have asthma. Dust and germs can worsen your asthma symptoms and cut off oxygen to your lungs. Because dust accumulates rather quickly, it is recommended that you dust your furniture and appliances at least once a week.

Make sure you know your breathing. Observe the way you breathe when you are calm and symptom free. When you realize that your breathing has changed you can consider relaxation and breathing techniques to calm you down to avoid severe asthma attacks. During an attack, try to return your breathing to its normal depth and rate.

If you have children with asthma, complete a regular inspection of your home. The most common triggers of asthma attacks in children are dust, mold and other harmful spores in the air. Checking your home once a year for these air pollutants is an effective way to prevent and treat your child’s asthma attacks.

Start and stick with a regular exercise regimen to help you control your asthma. Be aware of how your asthma affects your physical abilities, but remain active. This helps your endurance and lung capacity as well as serves as a stress relief. As a side benefit, regular exercise improves your overall health, making it easier to manage a chronic condition like asthma.

If you struggle with asthma, be sure to keep in contact with your doctor. If the medications that you are taking are not as effective as they once were, contact your doctor immediately. Your doctor will be able to increase your dosage or recommend you to a better medication that will meet your asthma needs.

If you have asthma, it is a good idea to use a vaporizer or dehumidifier in your home. A dehumidifier will help keep asthma triggers out of your air. If you are going to or are using a vaporizer or dehumidifier, be sure that it is properly cleaned before use. Be sure to clean it often, once you start using it.

If you are an asthma suffer consider long acting medication to help with asthma. These medications work by helping to control inflammation in the airways and as such help you breath more easily. These can be prescribed by your doctor and usually are covered by most insurance carriers.

If you have a child who suffers from asthma, make sure that you educate him about asthma and why following his treatment plans are so important. You should not only discuss what to do when he suffers an attack, you should also act out the steps. This will help your child to stay calm during an attack. Make sure that you also educate caregivers and siblings.

To help prevent asthma attacks, it’s a good idea to cut back on the use of harsh household cleaners. Look for environmentally-friendly, non-toxic cleansers instead of more traditional products containing harmful chemicals. Also, make sure to air out the house by opening the windows or turning on the air conditioner so the air left is pure and clean.

Watch for allergy attacks and replace your medication accordingly, if you are experiencing an attack more than twice a week. Most health professionals agree that having attacks more than twice a week is both dangerous and avoidable.

Your teenage child should be allowed to take a great deal of control over his or her asthma treatment plan, as long as the condition is being well-cared-for. Most teens do not want a parent telling them what to do and what not to do, so they will gladly take control of the management of their asthma symptoms.

Consult with your doctor regarding changing your asthma medications if you find that you are using your inhaler to stave off an asthma attack more than a couple of times each week. The same advice holds if your asthma symptoms wake you up during the night more than twice a week. All-in-all, you should not have to refill your inhaler prescription more than twice a year. If you are refilling more often than that, you should change to another medication.

Now that you have armed yourself with information on the common symptoms, triggers, and courses of treatment for this common respiratory condition, you will be better prepared to discuss medical care and prevention. Remember this useful and highly recommended advice to do whatever it takes to stay one step ahead of asthma.


Photo Credit: @Telegraph